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TOXIC PLANTS AND HOUSEHOLD POISONS - NOT FOR PETS!

Diana Fineran

Copyright August 23, 2003

 To prevent any possibility of your pet being poisoned keep the harmful plants listed below out of your house and garden.  This list may not be complete, because some plants are particular to your area, but it is certainly one of the most extensive lists of toxic plants and household poisons that are potentially harmful that we know of. 

IF YOUR PET HAS COME IN CONTACT WITH OR EATEN DANGEROUS GREENERY, CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY.

For FAST HELP contact

The National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC)
University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine
2001 S. Lincoln Avenue,
Urbana, IL  61801
(217) 333-2053
FAX (217)-333-4628

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER  (800) 548-2423

TOXIC PLANTS


“A”

Algae

Algerian Ivy

This is a climbing vine with shiny black berries and leaves characterized by wide, cream colored borders.  The leaves and berries are harmful.  The leaves contain a substance that reacts with the cholesterol in red blood cell membranes, causing the cells to rupture and burst.  A cat that bits or chews this plant may show signs such as burning in the throat, inflammation of the stomach and intestine, vomiting and diarrhea.

Almonds.

            Cyanide Poisoning.  The seeds are toxic.  Effects are involuntary defecation and urination.  Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes.

Aloe or Aloe Vera.  (See Medicine Plant)

Andromeda

Angel’s Trumpet.

            The seeds are toxic creating hallucinations.  Symptoms are intense thirst and disturbed vision.  The mucous membranes may be dry and the heart fluctuates, which leads to a delirious state and leater signs of madness.  Violent convulsions lead to coma.

Amaryllis

The roots and bulbs are toxic.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Apple.

            Cyanide Poisoning.  The seed are toxic.  Effects are involuntary defecation and urination.  Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes.

Apple Leaf Croton.

            The plant contains phorbol esters which may cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Apricot.

            Cyanide Poisoning.  The seeds are toxic.  Effects are involuntary defecation and urination. Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes. 

Arrowgrass

Arrowhead Vine

Asparagus Fern.

            Causes allergic dermatitis with repeated exposure.  The berries may cause vomiting.

Autumn Crocus.

            Causes oral irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, renal failure.  Clinical signs generally begin within 8 hours of ingestion.

Avocado.

            Causes vomiting, diarrhea, possible death, inflammation of mammary glands of rabbits, goats, cattle and horses.  In birds is causes respiratory distress, generalized congestion, fluid around the heart, generalized edema and Death.

Azalea

            Toxic symptoms include loss of appetite, repeated swallowing, salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, depression of central nervous system, cardiovascular collapse, Weakness, hypotension coma and death, and usually appear within 6 hours of ingestion.  The cat may go to the litter box frequently, but are unable to do anything.  They may also grind their teeth.


“B”

Big Chief.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.

Bird of Paradise.

            Causes gastrointestinal disorders, ataxia possible.

Bitter Cherry.

            Cyanide Poisoning. Only the seeds are dangerous.  Effects are involuntary defecation and urination.  Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes.

Bittersweet

Blackberry

Black Cherry or Wild Black Cherry.

            Cyanide Poisoning.  The seeds are poisonous.  Effects are involuntary defication and urination.  Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes.

Black Eyed Susan

Black Locust

Black Nightshade

Bleeding Heart

Boxwood

Bracken or Brake Fern

Branching Ivy. (see English Ivy)

Buckeye.

            Causes severe gastroenteritis, depression or excitement, vomiting, mydriasis, coma and death is possible.

Buddhist Pine.

            Severe vomiting and diarrhea

Burning Bush

Buttercup


“C”

Cactus (Spines)

Caladium

            A showy house plant that has heart shaped leaves which come in color combinations of green white, orange and red.  All parts of this plant, including the sap, contain poisonous crystals that cause burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue and throat.  Swelling of the tongue and throat often occurs, making breathing difficult.  If air passages become blocked, the cat may suffocate. 

Calla Lily

            The characteristics of this plant are smooth edged, arrow shaped leaves, which sometimes display white spots, grow on long, stout stalks.  The flower is a showy, petal

like leaf that varies in color from white to green to pink or yellow.  The leaves of the Calla Lily contain crystal of poisonous acid that cause a cat’s mouth and lips to burn.

Candelabra Cacus

            This plant produces a milky sap that irritates the skin, eyes and stomach.  Symptoms may be inflammation of the lining of the eyelid, or problems of the mouth.

Carolina Cherry Laurel

Castor Beans.

The seeds are large and mottled and the leaves are big and spread out like a hand.  Although castor oil contains no toxic substance, the seeds are extremely poisonous.  Symptoms may take up to 18 to 24 hours to appear.  The body temperature may rise, and there may be a slight depression.  The cat will become thirsty and show signs of colic.  Sweating will develop.  There may be severe diarrhea and terminal convulsions.

Ceriman. (see Philodendron)

Charming Dieffenbachia. (see Dumb Cane)

Cherry.

            Cyanide poisoning from seeds and leaves. Particularly toxic if in the process of withering.  Symptoms are brick red mucous membranes, apprehension, dilated pupils, hyperventilation and shock.

Cherry Laurel

China Tallow Tree

Chinese Evergreen

Chinese Photinia

Choke Cherry.

            Cyanide Poisoning.  It is the seeds that are poisonous.  Dogs have been poisoned from chewing on the bark.  Effects are involuntary defecation and urination.  Muscle ticks begin around the head and shoulders and lead to convulsions.  Breathing is difficult.  There is frothing and dilated pupils followed by coma.  One particular sign is bright red mucous membranes.

Climbing Lily

Christmas Rose

            This plant has medium sized flowers with five white or pinkish white petals and small fruit that contain many glossy black seeds.  The whole plant, particularly its rootstock and leaves, contains molecules of toxic substances that can damage a cat’s heart.  As if in warning, the plant gives off an unpleasant odor when any part of it is cut or broken.  Other irritants found in the plant cause symptoms such as pain in the mouth and abdomen accompanied by vomiting, bloody diarrhea and occasionally convulsions.

Chrysanthemum

Cineraria.

            Causes liver degeneration, depression, anorexia, vomiting and diarrhea, muddy mucous membranes and weakness.

Clematis

Climbing Nightshade

Cordatum. (see Philodendron)

Corn Plant.

            Clinical signs in cats are dilated pupils, dyspnea, abdominal pain, tachycardia and hypersalivation.

Cornstalk Plant. (see Corn Plant)

Crabgrass

Crocus

            The root and bulb are toxic.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Croton. (see Apple Leaf Croton)

Crown of Thorns

            All parts are poisonous.  The sap consists of complex, carbon based substances that cause inflammation of the skin and stomach. If the sap contacts the cat’s eyes, painful swelling of the corneas and conjunctivas may occur.

Cuban Laurel.

            Causes allergic dermatitis with possible vomiting and diarrhea.

Cutleaf Philodendron.  (see Philodendron)

Cycads.

            Causes vomiting, melena, icterus, polydipsia, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, bruising, coagulopathy and liver necrosis.

Cyclamen.

            Causes vomiting, gastrointestinal inflammation and death.


“D”

Daffodil

            The roots and bulbs are toxic. Causes gastrointestinal disorders, convulsions, shivering, hypotension, dermatitis hypotension, muscular tremors and cardiac arrhythmias.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Daphne Delphinium

Devil’s Ivy or Pothos. (see Philodendron)

            This plant had heart shaped leaves with generous streaks of yellow.  The leaves contain crystal of poisonous acid that cause burning and swelling of the mouth, tongue and throat.  A cat with sever Devil’s  Ivy poisoning may develop diarrhea.

Dieffenbachia

Dracaena Palm. (see Corn Plant)

Dragon Tree (see Corn Plant)

Dumb Cane or Mother in Law Plant or Dieffenbachia

            This tall, erect house plant has large, oblong leaves splotched with ivory color.  The leaves contain water insoluble crystals of a poisonous acid called calcium oxalate crystals. A cat that bites or chews a leaf will experience immediate burning and irritation of its lips, mouth and tongue.  These become swollen and painful, and the cat may have problems swallowing and breathing.  If the tongue swells enough to block the back of the throat, the cat may suffocate. The sap of this plant is harmful too.  If the cat breaks a leaf’s outer layer while batting at it, the leaf will release an unpleasant smelling sap.  If the sap comes in direct contact with the cat’s eyes, the corneas may cloud, and the conjunctivas (the membranes lining the eyelids) may become swollen and inflamed.  The plant gets it name because it causes a loss of voice.


“E”

Easter Lily.

            Causes potential renal failure.

Elaine. (See Apple Leaf Croton)

Elderberry

Elephant’s Ear

            Within moments after chewing on the plant the cat may begin shaking its head with pain and irritation.  It may drink to try to wash its mouth out.  All parts are toxic.  They cause irritation to the mucus membranes of the mouth.  There may be excessive salivation, and the tongue may swell with signs of diarrhea and vomiting.  Death has occurred in cases where the swollen tissue at the back of the mouth stopped air flow. 

Emerald Feather. (See Asparagus Fern) 

English Holly

English Ivy

            This is a climbing ivy with five lobed leaves and small black berries.  The leaves and berries are harmful.  The leaves contain a substance that reacts with the cholesterol in red blood cell membranes, causing the cells to rupture and burst.  A cat that bites or chews this plant may show signs such as burning in the throat, intense thirst, salivation inflammation of the stomach and intestine, hyperactivity, dyspnea, fever, polydipsia, mydriasis, muscular weakness, ataxia, coma hypersalivation, vomiting and diarrhea. The cat may become comatose and die within 24 to 48 hours.

English Laurel.

English Walnut.

The nut meats are not dangerous, but the hulls around the nut are.  Convulsions may occur within 20 to 30  minutes after ingestion.

Elderberry

Eucalyptus

Euonymus both evergreen and spreading

Euphorbia – over 1,600 varieties.

 Species such as Crown of Thorns and Snow on the Mountain.  Some have cactus like thorns and many have milky white sap.  All parts are poisonous.

European Bittersweet or Climbing Nightshade.

            This is a woody climbing plant with deep purple or blue flowers and red berries.  The berries are toxic.  Symptoms are loss of appetite, abdominal pain, vomiting and extreme diarrhea.  There also may be drooling, apathy, drowsiness, trembling and progressive weakness.

Evergreen Winter Creeper

Exotica Perfection Dieffenbachia. (See Dumb Cane)


“F”

Fiddle Leaf. (See Philodendron)

Fiddle-Leaf Fig.

            If sensitive, dermatitis on contact and possible vomiting and diarrhea.

Florida Anise

Florida Beauty. (See Corn Plant)

Foxglove.

            This is an extremely poisonous plant.  Symptoms may take 3 to 4 hours to appear, but the plant will produce vomiting and many trips to the litter box with no result.  The body temperature may drop and the heart fluctuate called, cardiac arrhythmias. Diarrhea and weakness are also symptoms. The lethal amount is extremely small.

Fraser’s Photinia

Fruit Salad Plant. (See Philodendron)


“G”

German Ivy.  (See Cineraria)

Giant Dumb Cane.  (See Dumb Cane)

Glacier Ivy.  (See English Ivy)

Gladiola

            The root and bulb are toxic.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Glory Lily

Gold Dieffenbachia.  (See Dumb Cane)

Gold Dust Dracaena.  (See Corn Plant)

Golden Pothos.  (See Philodendron)

Green Gold Nephthysis.  (See Philodendron)


“H”

Hahn’s Self Branching English Ivy.  (See English Ivy)

Heartleaf Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Heavenly Morning Glory.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.

Helleborus

Hemlock

Holly Berries.

            Causes vomiting and diarrhea plus central nervous system depression.

Horse Chestnut

Horsehead Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Hurricane Plant.  (See Philodendron)

Hyacinth

            The bulb is toxic.

Hydrangea

            The bulbs, flowers buds and the leaves of the hydrangea are extremely toxic, containing a compound that releases cyanide ions when it contacts water or saliva,  If a cat chews or bites a leaf, it may show symptoms similar to those of cyanide poisoning, such as abdominal pain, severe stomach upset, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, dizziness, respiratory stimulation, rapid heart rate and convulsions..  Swelling of the stomach and intestine soon follows.  In some cases, the cat may develop tremors, leading to problems with the heart, lungs or kidneys.


“I”

Indian Laurel.  (See Fiddle Leaf Fig)

Indian Rubber Plant.  (See Fiddle Leaf Fig)

Iris

            The root and bulb are toxic.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Ivy


“J”

Jack in the Pulpit

Jamestown Weed.

            The seeds are toxic and created hallucinations.  Symptoms are intense thirst and disturbed vision.  The mucous membranes may be dry and the heart fluctuates, which leads to a delirious state and later signs of madness. Violent convulsions lead to coma.

Janet Craig Dracaena.  (See Corn Plant)

Japanese Boxwood

Japanese Ligustrum

Japanese Show Lily

Japanese Yew.

            This looks like a fir, spruce or pine, with dark green needles, and red fleshy fruits.  Symptoms are trembling, dyspnea,  muscular weakness, shortness of breath, and collapse.  The toxic substance in this plant takes effect immediately, and death may occur before the signs become present. Sudden death comes from cardiac failure.

Jasmine.

            All parts of this plant are toxic.  Symptoms are muscular weakness, convulsions and respiratory failure.

Jerusalem Cherry

            This is a shrub or potted plant with bright red berries, which are toxic. Causes gastrointestinal disturbances, possible ulcerations of the gastrointestinal system, seizures, Central Nervous System and/or respiratory depression and shock.

Jimson Weed.

            The seeds are toxic.  They create hallucinations.  Symptoms are intense thirst and disturbed vision.  The mucous membranes may be dry and the heat fluctuates, which leads to a delirious state and later signs of madness. Violent convulsions lead to coma.

Jonquil


“K”

Kalanchoe.  May cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Kentucky Coffee Tree


“L”

 Laburnum

Lacy Tree Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Lantana

Larkspur

Laurel

Ligustrum

Lily of the Valley

            This is a small delicately scented perennial.  When the plant’s cut flowers are kept in water, the water becomes poisonous enough to kill an animal or a small child.  The flowers and berries of Lily of the Valley contain high concentrations of substances that can damage a cat’s heart  (cardiac arrhythmias) and disrupt heat distribution throughout the cat’s body.  Other irritants can cause pain in the mouth and throat as well as vomiting, abdominal pain, cramping, ataxia and diarrhea. The lethal amount is extremely small.

Locoweed


“M”

Madagascar Dragon Tree.  (See Corn Plant)

Malanga

            Within moments after chewing on the plant the cat may begin shaking its head with pain and irritation.  It may drink to try to wash its mouth out. All parts of the plant is toxic.  They cause irritation to the mucus membranes of the mouth.  There may be excessive salivation, and the tongue may swell with signs of diarrhea and vomiting.  Death has occurred in cases where the swollen tissue at the back of the mouth stopped air flow. 

Marbel Queen. 

Causes severe, prolonged depression, vomiting seen early, possible respiratory depression  (See Philodendron). 

Marigold

Marijuana, Bhang, Hashish, Hemp or Marihuana..

            Used in historical times to make rope.  Most toxicity is in the female plant during the time of flowering.  Cats are very attracted to it.  They eat the dried leaves or cigarette butts.  Treatment is problematic because the owner doesn’t like to tell a Veterinarian the entire story.  Symptoms are prolonged depression, vomiting, respiratory depression, derangement, changes in the sensory perception, and visual hallucinations.  There is also salivation, confusion, muscle tremors and hyperthermia.  The depression may give the appearance of falling asleep and may be prolonged.

Medicine Plant.

Causes diarrhea and change of urine color to red is possible. 

Mescal Buttons.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.

Mexican Breadfruit.  (See Philodendron)

Milk Bush

            This plant produces a milky sap that irritates the skin, eyes and stomach.  Symptoms may be inflammation of the lining of the eyelid or problems with the mouth.

Miniature Croton.  (See Apple Leaf Croton)

Mistletoe

            This plant had tiny flowers and white berries often used as Christmas decorations.  All parts of it are toxic, especially the berries. It was once used by American Indians as an abortifacient, and there are documented cases of poisoning in young women.  It eaten, it can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia and erratic central nervous system behavior

Monkshood

Morning Glory.

            Has hallucinogenic compounds similar to LSD found in seeds of some species.  Is  toxic and may cause diarrhea.

Mother in Law.  (See Philodendron)

Mushrooms.

            Over 3000 variations of mushrooms or toadstools exist, but only 800 can be identified without with out a microscope.  Variations are the Fly Agaric or Fly Amanita, the Death Cup and the  Death Cap.  Mushrooms usually have a bland taste that does not ward off a cat.  Symptoms with the Fly Amantia appear in 15 to 30 minutes with drooling and perspiration, vomiting and diarrhea.  The pulse is slow and irregular, pupils constrict, and breathing is difficult.  Drowsiness will follow, then a pronounced muscle spasm or excitement and ultimately deep sleep and coma.  The death cup takes about 6 to 12 hours to take effect, with violent vomiting, dehydration, muscle cramps, diarrhea, a feeble rapid pulse, low blood pressure, collapse and coma.


“N”

Naked Lady.

            The roots and bulbs are toxic.  Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.

Narcissus.  (See Daffodil)

Needlepoint Ivy.  (See English Ivy)

Nephthytis.  (See Philodendron)

Nettles, Stinging Nettle, Bull Nettles and Nettle Spurge.

            The plant has hairs that are irritating to cats when they rub against the plant. A cat may drool and paw at its mouth.  There is also muscle weakness and trembling.

Night Shade.

            This plant is usually 6 inches to 3 feet tall and has simple oval leaves and white flowers.  The berries start green and turn black as they ripen.  The ripe berries are no problem, but the green ones are. The plant contains solanine causing hypersalivation, anorexia, severe gastrointestinal disturbances, diarrhea, drowsiness, depression, confusion, weakness, dilated pupils, bradycardia,  central nervous system depression.

Nutmeg.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.


“O”

Ohio Buckeye

Oleander.

            It has leathery leaves about 4 to 12 inches in length, and flowers that vary in color from pure white to pink to reds and violets.  It has a pod like fruit about 1 to 4 inches long.  This is an extremely poisonous plant.  Even the bark and stems are toxic.The plant contains cardiac glycosides.  If an oleander sits beside a pond or fish tank, and the leaves fall into the water, it is very possible that the water will become toxic.  The plant produces a very bitter taste to water, so most pets will take one sip and walk away.  Symptoms may take 3 to 4 hours to appear, but the plant will produce oral irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, abnormal pulse rate, arryhthymias,  and many trips to the litter box with no result.  The body temperature may drop and the heart fluctuate.  The lethal amount is extremely small. Death results.

Onion. 

Causes gastrointestinal upset, hemolytic anemia.

Oriental Lily Peace Lily


“P”

Panda.  (See Philodendron)

Peace Lily.  (See Philodendron)

Peach.  (See Cherry)

Pearly Gates.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.

Pencil Cactus

            Causes reddened skin, blisters and itchiness after contact with parts. Also vomiting and diarrhea.

Periwinkle.

            An hallucinogen and toxic.

Peyote Cactus.

            An hallucinogen.  Peyote produces extraordinary color vision headaches, blurred vision, dizziness, vomiting and diarrhea.  This is similar, but less potent, than

the reaction of LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide).

Philodendron and Philodendron Pertusum.

            A popular houseplant that is a climbing vine with aerial roots, which has heart shaped or oblong leaves with occasional patterns of different colors.  The most harmful parts of the philodendron are the leaves, which contain needle like crystal of poisonous acids. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystal and has similar characteristics to the Dieffenbachia and Caladium.   When a cat bites or chews a leaf, the crystals enter the mucous membranes of the cat’s mouth, causing painful burning in the mouth, tongue and throat and sometimes gastrointestinal sings that are very severe and prolonged..  The leaves also contain a protein based chemical that, if swallowed, can harm a cat’s kidneys.  Because the acid crystal cause pain quickly after entering the mouth, cats rarely swallow pieces of philodendron leaves.

Plumosa Fern.  (See Asparagus Fern)

Poinsettia

            It produces a milky sap that can irritate the skin and mouth and also upsets the stomach and intestinal tract. Usually produces no ill effects if injested in small amounts. The plants may be red or white in color with green leaves.  Skin coming into contact with the sap should be washed with soap and water.

Poison Hemlock

Poison Ivy.

            Causes allergic dermatitis in humans, but usually not a problem in animals.

Poison Oak.  (See Poison Ivy)

Pokeweed

Potato

Pothos.  (See Philodendron)

Precatory Bean.

            The beans are very toxic causing severe vomiting and diarrhea with increased body temperature, ataxia, anorexia and death.

Primrose

Primula.

            Causes allergic dermatitis in humans, and possible gastrointestinal upset in animals.

Privet.

            The berries and leaves are toxic.  Ingestion can cause possible kidney dAmage and stomach irritation.

Purple Anise

Purple Foxglove


“R”

Red Emerald.  (See Philodendron)

Red Margined Dracaena.  (See Corn Plant)

Red Princess.  (See Philodendron)

Rhododendron.  (See Azalea)

            Toxic symptoms include loss of appetite, repeated swallowing, salivation, and vomiting and usually appear with in 6 hours of ingestion.  They may go to the litter box frequently, but are unable to do anything.  They may also grind their teeth.

Rhubarb

Ribbon Plant.  (See Corn Plant)

Rosary Pea, also known as the Precatory Bean, Jequirity Bean and Crabs Eye.

            The is a legume, vine that grows best in tropical climates.  The seeds are bright red with a black spot and are used in rosaries or necklaces.  The bean is extremely toxic.  The A.V.M.A. states that less than one seed, thoroughly chewed, is enough to kill a human.  Symptoms may take a while to develop.  The body temperature rises, followed by depression.  There is a loss of appetite and violent purgation.  The cat may become uncoordinated or paralyzed.

Rubber Plants


“S”

Saddle Leaf Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Sago Lily

Sago Palm.  (See Cycads)

Satin Pothos.  (See Philodendron)

Schefflera.  (See Philodendron)

Silver Pothos.  (See Philodendron)

Skunk Cabbage

            Within moments after chewing on the plant the cat may begin shaking its head with pain and irritation.  It may drink to try to wash its mouth out.  All parts of the plant are toxic.  They cause irritatin to the mucus membranes of the mouth.  There may be excessive salivatin, and the tongue may swell with signs of diarrhea and vomiting.  Death has occurred in cases where the swollen tissue at the back of the mouth stopped air flow.

Snow on the Mountain

            All parts of the plant are poisonous.  The sap consists of complex, carbon based substances that cause inflammation of the skin and stomach.  If the sap contacts the cat’s eyes, painful swelling of the corneas and conjunctivas may occur.

Spathiphyllum

            This plant has clusters of shiny, elliptical, dark green leaves on short tems.  The flowers appear as white or pale green petal like leaves surrounding a central spike that resembles a miniature ear of corn.  All part of the spathiphyllum contain water insoluble crystal of poisonous acid that can cause burning, irritation and swelling of a cat’s mouth, tongue and throat.  When swallowed, the srystals cause inflammation of the stomach and intestine.

Spider Plant

Split Leaf Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Spotted Dumb Cane.  (See Dumb Cane)

Spring Bulbs

Stinging Nettle

String of Pearls/Beads.

            Causes abdominal pain, irregular pulse, vomiting, diarrhea and emaciation.

Striped Dracaena.  (See Corn Plant)

Sweetheart Ivy.  (See English Ivy)

Swiss Cheese Plant (Split Leaf Philodendron)

            This is a large, tropical house plant with a woody stem.  The name comes from its thick, glossy leaves covered with randomly shaped holes.  The leaves are the most dangerous parts of the plant.  If a cat ingests a leaf, painful burning of the mouth, tongue and throat results, causing blisters and swelling of tender tissue.  In serious

cases, the cat may have difficulty swallowing.


“T”

Taro Vine.  (See Philodendron)

Texas Buckeye

Thorn Apple.

            The seeds are toxic, and create hallucinations.  Symptoms are intense thirst and disturbed vision.  The mucous membranes may be dry and the heart fluctuates, which leads to a delirious state and later signs of madness. Violent convulsions lead to coma. 

Tiger Lily

Tinsel Tree

            The plant produces a milky sap that irritates the skin and stomach.  Symptoms may be inflammation of the eyelid or problems of the mouth.

Tobacco.

            This is a tall, large leafed plant with tubular flowers about 2 inches long and white to lavender in color.  Cats come into contact with tobacco through cigarette and digar butts.  Symptoms may develop in 15 minutes or several hours.  Death may occur within minutes after the symptoms arise or may be delayed for hours and up to days.  Signs are salivation and vomiting and diarrhea.  The cat may shake, shiver and twitch with weakness and staggering.  The effect of nicotine first stimulates, and then it depresses.  Breathing is difficult, and it is crucial to assist with respiration.  Nicotine acts quickly, and the cat owner is usually unable to reach a Veterinarian in time.

Toad Stool

Tomato Plant. (See Nightshade)

            Both the leaves and stems contain solanine. 

Tree  Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Tropic Snow Dumbcane.  (See Dunb Cane)

Trumpet Vine.

            The seeds are toxic and cause hallucinations.  Symptoms are intense thirst and disturbed vision.  The mucous membranes may be dry and the heart fluctuates. Which leads to a delirious state and later signs of madness.  Violent convulsions lead to coma.

Tulip

The root and bulb are toxic. Symptoms range from nausea to violent diarrhea.  The diarrhea may cause uncontrollable bleeding, extreme exhaustion and death.


“V”

Variable Dieffenbachia.  (See Dumb Cane)

Variegated Philodendron.  (See Philodendron)

Variegated Rubber Plant.  (See Fiddle Leaf Fig)


“W”

Wandering Jew

Warneckei Dracaena.  (See Corn Plant)

Water Hemlock

Wax Leaf Ligustrum

Weeping Fig.  (See Fiddle Leaf Fig)

Western Soapberry

Wild Black Cherry

Winged Euonymus

Wisteria


“Y”

Yellow Be Still Tree.

            This is an extremely poisonous plant.  Symptoms may take 3 to 4 hours to appear, but the plant will produce vomiting and many trips to the litter box with no result.  The body temperature may drop and the heart fluctuate.  The lethal amount is extremely small.

Yellow Jasmine

Yew.  (See Japanese Yew)

            This looks like a fir, spruce or pine, with dark green needles and red fleshy fruits.  Symptoms are trembling, muscular weakness, shortness of breath, and collapse.  The toxic substance in this plant takes effect immediately and death may occur before the signs become present.

PRECAUTIONS

A few simply ways to prevent poisoning can be easy to do and satisfy your enjoyment of plants, but still keep your cat away from toxins.

  • Keep hazardous plants out of your cat’s reach.  Hang the pots from hooks in the ceiling, or place them on shelves or cabinets that you know your cat can not reach.

  • Your cat must be an indoor only cat at all times.  To enjoy the outdoor, train your cat to walk on a leash. That mutual exercise allows your cat a chlorophyll fix on safe, green grass.  Before you let your cat nibble the grass, make sure the grass is free of chemicals and pesticides.

  • If you are not able to walk your cat, then grow wheat or oat grass indoors in pots.  Many cats enjoy nibbling these hardy plants.  Seeds and growing kits are available at pet stores or through magazines.

  • Grow a pot of catnip.  Completely safe to eat, this herb will bring out the kitten in the most elderly cat.

  • Trains you cat to stay away from plants by spraying your cat with a water mister, when your cat goes near your plants.

  • If you live in an area with a milder climate, consider moving your plants onto the porch or patio.

  • Consider removing all poisonous plants and replacing them with safe plants. NOW!

IF YOUR CAT SHOWS SIGNS OF POISONING TAKE YOUR CAT TO YOUR VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY!

For FAST help contact:

The National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC)
University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine
2001 S. Lincoln Avenue
Urbana IL.   61081
(217) 333-2053
 
FAX (217-333-4628      

 EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER (800) 548-2423

________________________________________________________________________

NON-POISONOUS PLANTS


“A”

Acajou

African Violet

Aluminum Plant

American Rubber Plant

Arabian Gentian

Aralia Elegantissima

Aralia Laciniata

Ardisia Crenulata

Ardisia Paniculata

Ardisia Pickeringia

Areca Lutescens

Areca Palm

Aregelia

Artilery Plant

Aspidium Falcatum

Aspidistra Lurida

Australian Laurel


“B”

Baby Jade

Baby Rubber Plant

Baby’s Breath

Baby Tears

Baby Ti

Bamboo Palm

Bar Room Plant

Begonias

Blushing Bromeliad

Bold Sword Fern

Boston Fern

Bottle Palm

Brian Plant

Buckhorn Plantain

Butterfly Palm


“C”

Cane Palm

Candle Plant

Cape Jasmine

Cast Iron Plant

Cathedral-Windows

Cauliflower Ears

Chamaedorean Humilis

Chinese Jade

Chinese Rubber Plant

Chocolate Soldier Plant

Cissus Bakerana

Cissus Rotundifolia

Clearweed

Coleus

Collinia Elegans

Coolwort

Coral Beads

Coralberry

Crassula Arborea

Crassula Portulacea

Creeping Charlie

Crimson Cup

Crisped Featherfern

Crossandra Undulifolia

Cryptanthus Bankeri

Cryptanthus Diversifolius

Cryptanthus Roseus

Cyrtudeira Reptans


“D”

Dallas Fern

Dog Berry

Donkey Tail

Dracaena

Duffii Fern

Duffy Fern

Dwarf Boston Fern

Swarf Date Palm

Dwarf Feather Fern

Dwarf Palm

Swarf Fose Stript Star

Swarf Rubber Plant

Swarf Whitman Fern


“E”

Earth Star

Elephant Foot Tree

Emerald Ripple

Episcia dianthiflora


“F”

False Aralia

Fantasia

Feather Fern

Fingernail Plant

Firecracker Flower

Fish Tail Fern

Flame African Violet

Falme Violet

Fluffy Ruffles

Freckle Face

Friendship Plant

Frosty


“G”

German Violet

Gloxinia

Golden Feather Palm

Fold Luck Palm

Grape Ivy

Green Earth Star

Green Ripple Peperomia


“H”

Hardy Baby Tears

Hawaiian Ti Plant

Hibiscus

Hindu Rope Plant

Holly Fern

Honey Plant

Hoya Carnosa “Compacta”

Hoya Carnosa “Exotica”

Hoya Carnosa “Variegata”


“I”

Iacorea Paniculata

Iron Cross Begonia

Iron Plant

Ivy Leaf Peperomia

Ivy Peperomia


“J”

Jade Plant

Jade Tree

Japanese Holly Fern

Japanese Pittosporum

Japanese Rubber Plant


“K”

Kaempferis


“L”

Lace Flower Vine

Lady Lou

Large Rose Stripe Star

Leather Peperomia

Lipstick Plant

Little Fantasy peperomia


“M”

Maidens Breath

Marbled Fingernail

Marbled Rainbow Plant

Marbled Spoon

Marlberry

Measles Plant

Mock Orange

Mosaic Plant

Moss Agate

Miniature Fish Tail

Miniature Marble Plant

Miniature Red

Miniature Red Earth Star


“N”

Narrow Leaved Plantain

Natal Plum

Neanthebella

Nerve Plant

Nolina tuberculata


“O”

Ossifragi Vase


“P”

Panamiga

Parlor Palm

Peacock Plant

Peperomia Fosteri

Peperomia Hederifolia

Peperomia Peltifolia

Peperomia Sandersii

Peperomia rotundifolia

Pepper Face

Persian Violet

Pheasant Plant

Piggy Back

Pigmy Date Palm

Pilea Callitrichoides

Pilea Mucosa

Pink Pearl

Pink Polka Dot

Pleomele

Polka Dot Plant

Polystichum Falcatum

Pony Tail Plant

Porcelain Flower

Prayer Plant

Purple Baby Tears

Purple Passion Vine

Purple Velvet Plant


“Q”

Queen’s Tears


“R”

Rabbit’s Foot

Red African Violet

Red Edge Peperomia

Red Veined Prayer Plant

Resurrection Lily

Thiocissus Tridentata

Rhynchophorum Obtusifolium

Richweed

Rose Stripe Star

Roosevelt Fern

Royal Velvet Plant


“S”

Saffron Spike’Satin Pellionia

Silver Dollar

Silver Leaf peperomia

Silver Jade Plant

Silver Star

South American Air Plant

Spiceberry

Spider Aralia

Spider Plant

Spleenwort

Starfish Plant

Striped Blussing Bromeliad

Swedish Ivy

Sword Fern


“T”

Tall Feather Fern

Ti Plant


“V”

Valor Plant

Variegated Cast Iron Plant

Variegated Wandering Jew

Vary Leaf Star

Velvet Plant

Verona Fern

Verona Lace Fern

Vining Peperomia


“W”

Wandering Jew

Watermelon Begonia Watermelon Peperomia

Watermelon Pilea

Wax Plant

Whitman Fern


“Y”

Yellow Butterfly Palm

Yellow Palm

Yerba Linda


“Z”

Zebra Plant

HOUSEHOLD POISONS

Acetaminophen

Tylenol, Datrill, etc.

Antifreeze

Aspirin

Bleach

Boric Acid

Brake Fluid

Carbon Monoxide

Carburetor  Cleaner

Cleaning Fluid

Deodorants

Deodorizers

Disinfectants

Drain Cleaner

Dye

Fungicides

Furniture Polish

Gasoline

Hair Colorings

Herbicides

Ionsecticides

Laxatives

Metal Polish

Mineral Spirits

Mothballs

Nail Polish and Remover

Paint Paint Remover

Permanent Wave Lotaion

Phenol

Photographic Developer

Rat Poison

Rubbing Alcohol

Shoe Polish

Sleeping Pills

Snail or Slug Bait

Soaps/Detergents

Suntan Lotion

Tar

Turpentine

Windshield Washer Fluid

Wood Preservatives

IF YOUR CAT HAS COME INTO CONTACT WITH OR EATEN DANGEROUS CHEMICALS, CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY

For FAST Help

The National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC)
University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine
2001 S. Lincoln Avenue
Urbana, IL  61801
(217) 333-2053
FAX (217)-333-4628

EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBER (800) 548-2423

For additional information on poisonous and Toxic Plants check out the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine at
http://chppm-www.apgea.army.mil/ento/plant.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
   
 
 
                

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